Ultraviolet Light and the Eyes

What are the Effects of Ultraviolet (UV) Light and the Eyes?

Ultraviolet light has been linked to the progression of several eye conditions.  The most common conditions are the development of macular degeneration and cataracts.  Both of these conditions can affect the quality of your vision.  Ultraviolet light rays can also cause ptergium (fleshy growths on the eye surface that grow onto the cornea) and eye cancers such as melanoma and basal cell carcinoma.

Macular degeneration can potentially lead to irreversible blindness.  Cataract development can affect the quality of your vision and sometimes require surgery to improve the vision.  Although most people develop cataracts as they age, cataracts can develop quicker due to ultraviolet light.

Ultraviolet Light Protection for the EyesUltraviolet light | Alaina Kronenberg MD | Eye Surgery Institute

When you purchase sunglasses, you want to look for ones that eliminate 100% of UV A and UV B rays.  The glasses do not necessarily need to be expensive.  The darkness of the lens is not as important. Most lenses will state the amount of UVA and UVB protection that they provide.

Lenses that wrap around the side of your face provide more protection than regular sunglasses.  Wearing a hat with a large rim can also be helpful.  Although some contact lenses do offer some UV protection, it is important to also wear sunglasses if you are a contact lens wearer to protect your eyes.

Detecting Eye Problems

Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I can perform a comprehensive eye examination to detect eye conditions.  If a problem does develop, it is often better to diagnose and offer potential treatments early.  We can perform a dilated eye exam and check for problems.  The Eye Surgery Institute also sells good quality sunglasses that can help to protect your eyes from sun damage.

 

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126


Eye Health

Eye Health

Eye health is an important part of your overall health.  It is important to have a comprehensive eye exam to ensure that your eyes are healthy.  Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I can ensure you are seeing properly and ensure that no eye diseases are present.

You may assume that your eyes are healthy if you have no difficulty with your vision.  Sometimes, we can determine that a glasses prescription can allow even better vision.  Common eye diseases such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration (ARMD), diabetic eye disease and early cataracts often have no symptoms at the early or even moderate stages.  Early diagnosis and treatment can be very important.

Our goal at the Eye Surgery Institute is to allow you to keep optimal vision your entire life.  Many diseases require diagnosis and treatment at early stages to help prevent vision loss in the future.

Family Historyeye health  Alaina Kronenberg MD | Eye Surgery Institute

Many eye diseases can run in your family.  It is important to know your family history of eye diseases.  If you have a strong family history of eye problems, it is important to have more frequent eye examinations especially as you age.

Eye Safety

It is important to wear safety eye protection especially when working with tools, machines or chemicals.  This can include safety glasses, eye shields and goggles.  Many are made of polycarbonate because it is much stronger and more protective.   It is especially important to wear eye protection if you only have one eye that sees well.

Lifestyle

It can be helpful to eat a healthy diet with lots of green, leafy vegetables.  This can help prevent certain eye diseases such as macular degeneration.

It is useful to wear sunglasses when outside.  This can help prevent against cataracts and macular degeneration.  It is also helpful to not smoke.  Smoking is bad for your overall health, including your eyes.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan


Midwest Eye Clinic

Midwest Eye Clinic/ Midwest Medical Clinic

The Midwest Eye Clinic in Dearborn, Michigan has now closed.  It served the population of Dearborn and the surrounding communities for eye and other health care needs.  Eye Surgery Institute is accepting new patients.  The Eye Surgery Institute has been serving the Dearborn and surrounding community for over 60 years.  We are happy to welcome patients of the Midwest Clinic who are looking for health care.

Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Alaina Kronenberg and Dr. Cindy Wang would like to welcome you to join our practice.  We perform comprehensive medical and surgical eye care and have a full service optical department also.  Our doctors can serve all of your eye care needs.  We accept most insurance plans.

Eye Surgery Institute/Midwest Eye ClinicMidwest Eye Clinic | Eye Surgery Institute

Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Alaina Kronenberg are comprehensive board certified ophthalmologists who perform medical and surgical care of your eyes.  We strive to provide the highest quality care and pride ourselves on taking much time with each patient to ensure all your questions and concerns are addressed.  We perform a thorough, comprehensive eye examination.

Dr. Cindy Wang is an optometrist who specializes in fitting glasses and contact lenses.  She is excellent at fitting contact lenses in patients who have been difficult to fit with contacts in the past.  Dr. Wang has also been specially trained in fitting patient who have corneal conditions such as keratoconus and prior RK eye surgery.  She also specializes in low vision eye care.  She can help provide special glasses and other low vision aids to allow a better quality of life for patients with low vision.

We Hope You Join Our Practice from Midwest Eye Clinic!

If you were previously a patient at the Midwest Eye Clinic, we hope you will join us at the Eye Surgery Institute for your continued eye care needs!

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan


How Do I Get Rid of My Glasses?

Need For Glasses

Wearing glasses can sometimes be frustrating.  You may need to wear glasses to allow you to see properly.  They are often needed when the light rays are not focused onto the retina.  Depending on the severity, you may need glasses some of the time or all of the time.  As we get into our 40’s, most of us need glasses for reading and other up close activities.

Contact LensesGlasses | Contacts | Lasik

Contact lenses are an option to reduce your need to wear glasses.  It is a lens that sits on the eye that allows you to see clearly.  Contact lenses need to be fit properly by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist.  At the Eye Surgery Institute, we provide full service optical services.

Dr. Cindy Wang, Dr. Stanley Grandon and I can perform a comprehensive eye examination and a contact lens fitting.  We can spend the proper time needed to teach you how to insert and remove the contacts and how to care for them properly.  Sometimes you may need to try different types and brands of contacts to find the ones that work best for you.

Lasik

Lasik is an elective surgical procedure and the goal is improve vision and reduce or eliminate the need for glasses.  We use a laser to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, and/or astigmatism.  The purpose of Lasik is to reshape the cornea so that the light rays entering into the eye are focused onto the retina.

Determining if you are a candidate for Lasik requires a comprehensive eye examination.  Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I will perform a thorough exam to determine the general health of your eye and if you are a candidate.  Dr. Stanley Grandon and I are board certified ophthalmologists and we will perform your surgery.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 4


Dry Eyes

Do I Have Dry Eyes

You may not realize that your eyes are dry.  The symptoms of dry eyes can vary.  You may have a foreign body sensation in your eyes with a gritty, stinging, burning or scratchy sensation.  In addition, you may have blurry vision especially with concentrated tasks such as reading, on your computer, watching television or driving for a long period of time.  Usually the vision is better when you initially start these tasks but blurs after a period of time.

What is Dry Eyes?Dry eyes | Alaina Kronenberg MD | Eye Surgery Institute

Dry eyes is an often chronic condition where the eyes don’t produce either enough tears or good quality of tears to keep the surface of the eye healthy and comfortable.  Dry eyes can become more common as you age.  It is also often influenced by the amount of screen time.  Often oral medications you may be taking for other conditions can worsen dry eye.

Diagnosis

Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I can perform a comprehensive eye examination.  Often dry eyes can be diagnosed after taking a history of your symptoms and looking at the eyelids and ocular surface with a slit lamp.  It is important to look for other eye diseases that can also contribute to discomfort.  We also provide tear osmolarity testing to aid in diagnosis.

Treatment

If you have not already tried over the counter products, we may initially ask you to use artificial tears during the day and somtimes ointment at bedtime.  If you have already tried these products or your condition is more severe, we may start you on prescription products.

It is also important to treat any other eye conditions such as blepharitis and ocular allergies.  Sometimes a plug into the tear duct (punctal plugs) can be useful in managing dry eyes.  It is important to realize there is no cure for dry eyes, but our job is to make your eyes as comfortable as possible.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126


Eye Myths Part 2

Eye Myths

There is a lot of information your friends or family may say about your eyes.  Do you ever wonder if what they say is really true?  Should you follow their advice?  There is a lot of confusion regarding what is really true about your eye health.  Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I can discuss your concerns in our office.  Here is some information regarding common eye myths.

Myth: My Children Should Not Sit Too Close to the TVEye myths | Alaina Kronenberg MD

Your children will not suffer any damage to their eyes if they sit too close to the television.  If your child insists on sitting close, you may want to schedule a comprehensive eye examination to ensure that no glasses are needed and that no other eye problems are present.

Myth: If My Eye Doctor Feels I Need a Stronger Glasses Prescription, I Will Become Too Dependent on the Glasses if I Fill the Prescription

It is important to wear glasses with the correct prescription to provide the best vision possible.  Your eyes will not worsen if you wear the correct pair of glasses or contacts.  Children’s glasses prescription can often get stronger in the teenage years. Having the proper prescription in their glasses will allow them to see properly at school, for sports and for when the start to drive.

Myth: It is Dangerous to Wear Someone Else’s Glasses

Wearing another person’s glasses may cause a headache, eye strain and blurry vision.  It will not cause any permanent damage to your eyes.  It is important to have a comprehensive eye examination and be checked for glasses.

If I Use My Eyes Will They Wear Out?

Using your eyes for daily activities will not cause any damage to your eyes.  You cannot damage your eyes by reading too much, being on your computer too much or watching too much television.  Your eyes may feel tired and fatigued from the concentrated tasks though.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126


Running in the Boston Marathon

Running

I have always enjoyed running for exercise in my free time.  It allows me to keep fit and helps to relieve stress.   I have participated in several half marathons and shorter races for many years.  In the past few years I have enjoyed participating in marathons.  I just completed my third Boston marathon.

The marathon is a 26.2 mile running race.  Training for a marathon requires a lot of time and commitment.  The Boston marathon is on Patriots Day the third Monday in April.  It is a hilly race so it requires training for the race in hilly terrain.  It also requires training outside in the cold Michigan winter months!

The miles of running also can take their toll on your body!  It is always a challenge to avoid injuries during the training process.

Boston QualificationAlaina Kronenberg MD| Eye Surgery Institute| Boston Marathon

It is considered a privilege to participate in the Boston marathon.  For most runners it is the most prestigious marathon.  The race has been run since 1897 and it is one of the world’s oldest marathons.  Running in the marathon requires you to run a full marathon at a time that is qualifying.  The required time depends on your age and your sex.  Many runners aspire to qualify for the Boston marathon.  Most other marathons are “Boston qualifiers” where you can run that race with the goal of trying to qualify.

Participating in My Third Boston Marathon

On April 17, 2017 I had the privilege of participating in my third consecutive Boston marathon.  The excitement and enthusiasm at Boston is incredible.  The city of Boston comes alive with thousands of spectators offering incredible support and enthusiasm.  They are cheering you on for all 26.2 miles.  The race starts in Hopkinton and ends on Boylston Street in Boston.   The amazing energy and excitement makes me shiver as I made that last turn onto Boylston street with the finish line in view.  I was incredibly honored to complete my third Boston marathon!

 

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126

 


Eye Myths

Eye myths| Alaina Kronenberg MD| Eye Surgery InstituteEye Myths

There is a lot of information your friends or family may say about your eyes.  Do you ever wonder if what they say is really true?  Should you follow their advice?  There is a lot of confusion regarding what is really true about your eye health.  Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I can discuss your concerns in our office.  Here is some information regarding common eye myths.

Myth: You should not have cataract surgery until it is “ripe”

A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens in your eye.  Most people develop a cataract as they age.  You should consider having cataract surgery when you are unhappy with your vision with your glasses on during your daily activities.  Cataract surgery is a relatively safe, outpatient eye surgery.  It is important that we perform a comprehensive eye examination to check for other conditions that can be affecting your vision.

Myth: You should not read in dim light

It is not harmful for your eyes to read in dim light.  Reading in dim light may make your eyes feel strained or tired, but it will not cause any long term damage.

Myth:  It is bad for my eyes if I sit too close to the television

It will not harm your eyes if you are sitting too close to the television.  If your child insists on sitting close to the television, you may want to make sure they have normal vision.  I recommend they have an eye examination to check for the need for glasses as well as other eye problems.

Myth: I don’t really need safety glasses

Severe eye injuries can often happen when you are least expecting it.  It is important to use eye protection to prevent injuries that can lead to blindness.  It is especially important to use safety eye protection if you have poor vision in one of your eyes.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126


Blepharitis

What is Blepharitis?

Are your eyelids or eyes red, sore, irritated, have a foreign body sensation or do you suffer from itchy or crusty eyelids?  You may have blepharitis.  It is a common condition that causes inflammation of either the inside or the outside of the eyelids.

Blepharitis is usually not an infection.  Is it usually not contagious to other people.   You may notice your symptoms to be either constant or intermittent.  It often tends to be chronic or recur frequently and can be very bothersome.

Types of DiseaseBlepharitis | Alaina Kronenberg MD | Eye Surgery Institute

There are several causes for blepharitis.  The two main types: anterior blepharitis and posterior blepharitis (also called meibomian gland disease MGD).  It is important to distinguish between these two types to offer the proper treatments to our patients.

Blepharitis and Dry eyes

Many patients have dry eyes at the same time.  It is important for Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I to perform a careful slit lamp examination to determine the proper cause of your symptoms.   This will allow us to offer treatments that will offer the most improvement in your symptoms.  We can also perform a tear osmolarity test that helps determine how dry your eyes are.

Treatment

The amount of treatment recommended often depends on the type of disease and the severity of the disease.  If you have anterior blepharitis, we often recommend keeping the eyelids clean with baby shampoo scrubs or eyelid cleaning pads or solutions.  Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I may also prescribe a short course of antibiotic eye ointment for your eyelids at bedtime.

If your disease is more posterior (meibomian gland disease), warm compresses can be very helpful.  Lubrication drops can be helpful.  Sometimes anti inflammatory drops can be helpful also.  It is also important to treat concomitant dry eye disease to achieve relief of your symptoms.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126


Nutrition and Eye Health

Eye Health

Carrots are the food you probably think are best for eye health.  In fact, there are many foods that are healthy for your eyes.  Foods that are rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc and the omega 3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are important for both the health of your eyes and your body in general.  It is never to early to maintain a healthy diet!

Eating a diet with these vitamins and nutrients may decrease your chances of developing or worsened age related macular degeneration, cataracts and dry eyes.  It is still important to maintain regular comprehensive eye examinations to check the health of your eyes even if you maintain a healthy diet.  Dr. Stanley Grandon, Dr. Cindy Wang and I can evaluate your eye health and check you for all eye diseases.

AREDS 2Nutrition and eye health| Alaina Kronenberg MD| Eye Surgery Institute

AREDS stands for the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. This was a large study that showed specific vitamins can delay or reduce the risk of developing advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

The AREDS formulation includes:

  • 500 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C
  • 400 international units of vitamin E
  • 15 mg beta-carotene
  • 80 mg zinc as zinc oxide
  • 2 mg copper as cupric oxide

Taking these vitamins can reduce your risk of developing advanced AMD by about 25% over 5 years.  These vitamins are typically recommended in patients with either intermediate or advanced AMD.  You can continue your multivitamin if you are taking AREDS vitamins.

These vitamins were not shown to prevent you from developing early AMD.  It is not possible to get enough of the vitamins in your diet if you have intermediate or advanced AMD.  If you are taking AREDS vitamins, it is important that you make your primary care doctor aware to ensure it is not interacting with other medications you are on.

Alaina Kronenberg, M.D.
Cataract Specialist
Comprehensive Ophthalmologist
Dearborn, Michigan 48126